Novels written in Scots: ten to add to your TBR

There’s been a resurgence of books written in Scots in the past few years or so. We’ve already featured recent reads like The Young Team and Duck Feet a fair bit on our blog and socials in the past few months but if you’re desperate for some more then here’s a longer list of novels to add to your TBRs.

The Young Team by Graeme Armstrong

Based on Graeme’s own experiences growing up as part of the gang culture in Airdrie you can’t have missed The Young Team because it’s been absolutely everywhere since it was published last year. This is gritty, real, hard-hitting and can’t be missed.

Duck Feet by Ely Percy

Duck Feet is the ultimate nostalgia read for anyone who grew up in Scotland in the late 1990s/early 2000s. This is the kind of book that’ll have you laughing one minute and greetin’ the next. It doesn’t hold back and gives the kind of realistic warts-and-all depiction of growing up Scottish that most people will appreciate.

A Working Class State of Mind by Colin Burnett

Colin Burnett’s debut, A Working Class State of Mind, is a linked short story collection written in east coast dialect. It’s a bold book with memorable characters and doesn’t hold back on criticisms of the UK government and how society looks down on the working class.

Before Now: memoir of a toerag by Moira McPartlin

Before Now is another novel that would appeal to anyone that loved the nostalgia aspect of Duck Feet. Written in Fife dialect it’s the story of one working class lad figuring out his life and making some realisations about his family and community along the way.

Buddha Da by Anne Donovan

I’ve not actually read this yet but in his review oor Aiden said, “Buddha Da embraces you from the first sentence, told through three distinct narratives… We navigate through some heavy topics which are told with poignancy but uplifted with quirky dialogue. The characters are so endearing which engrosses the reader in their story, I felt like I was part of their family.”

The Tartan Special One by Barry Phillips

The Tartan Special One is a surreal book written in Dundonian dialect. It’s absolutely hilarious and would appeal to anyone who loves the batshit aspect of Scottish football. I don’t think it’s in print anymore but copies are relatively easy to get hold of.

Be Guid Tae Yer Mammy by Emma Grae

Emma Grae has written such an incredible multi-generational story about working class Scottish women. Be Guid tae yer Mammy is a book to give up a whole day for and just settle in to enjoy the drama, funny stuff and touching moments in this very Scottish story.

How Late it was, How Late by James Kelman

A Booker prize winner written in Scots? How Late it Was, How Late isn’t the easiest of reads for multiple reasons but this story of quite possibly the worst hangover in existence is well worth the effort.

But n Ben A-Go-Go by Matthew Fitt

Dystopian fiction but write it in Lallans. Matthew Fitt is a bit of a Scots language publishing hero so But n Ben A-Go-Go is not to be missed…except I have missed it (oops) but it’s on my TBR and I’ll be getting to it asap.

Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh

I mean…obviously. I wasn’t even going to include it in the list because at this point who hasn’t heard of Trainspotting. But leaving it out would be amiss so here it is. A classic, an unmistakable voice and a book that feels just as relevant today as it did in the 90s.

There are also a decent amount of books originally published in English that have been translated into Scots. I think it’s especially brilliant to find children’s books that have been published in Scots including a few of Roald Dahl’s (Chairlie and the Chocolate Works or The Guid Freendly Giant, anyone?) or Alice’s Adventirs in Wunnerlaun. Look out for a whole other post about Scottish children’s books coming very soon.

What is your favourite book in Scots? Are there any we don’t have on the list but that should definitely be there?

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